Hiding in Algeria

Algeria’s LGBT community celebrated TenTen, its national day of solidarity, on October 10. France 24 report on Algeria’s rainbow weddings, used to avoid being detected as gay.

Every year, hundreds or even thousands of gay people across Algeria get married in such “rainbow weddings”, because of social and familial pressure. In a country where homosexuality is a crime – punishable by two months to two years in prison, along with a heavy fine – marrying a person of another gender has become the alternative to coming out, when the latter leads to ostracisation from society.

http://www.france24.com/en/20171011-gay-lesbian-algeria-rainbow-marriage-lgbt-prejudice-discrimination

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Romania pulls up the shutters

Romania is gearing up to hold a referendum to amend the constitution to prohibit gay marriage, a move that civil rights groups warn could put the country on an “illiberal” path alongside the likes of Hungary and Poland, writes Politico.

Romania’s civil code forbids same-sex marriage, and civil partnerships have not been introduced.

The planned vote — which could be held as early as November — is the result of a campaign by “Coalition for Family,” which brings together more than 40 groups, many of them religious or describing themselves as “pro-life.” They gathered more than 3 million signatures to force a referendum.

http://www.politico.eu/article/romania-gay-marriage-turns-illiberal-with-moves-against/

FA 0, Gay footballers 0

The Football Association’s attempts to make contact with gay professional footballers have drawn a blank, with “not one” willing to meet the organisation’s chairman, Greg Clarke, even in secret or anonymously, reports the Telegraph. Mr Clarke commented:

“I’ve met a lot of gay activists, gay publishers. I went down to Stonewall, watched a game, had a beer in the bar afterwards – and talked about the issues. At the semi-pro level and below, nobody’s worried. I haven’t met one player at professional level who would even agree to meet me in the middle of nowhere for a conversation over a cup of coffee. Not one.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/2017/10/03/fa-draws-total-blank-bid-make-contact-gay-professional-footballers/

Hate leaflet given out at UKIP conference

The Mirror reports that a leaflet which compared the “alternative lifestyle” of gay people to that of Hitler and the Yorkshire Ripper, titled ‘Homosexuality – the real alternative’, was available on a stand this morning for the Support 4 The Family group at UKIP’s annual get-together in Torquay.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/leaflet-ukip-conference-compares-gay-11257866

India’s sham shame

The Times of India looks into why so many gay Indian men are going into sham marriages.

Marriages of convenience are clandestine part of South Asian gay culture — a homosexual man and woman decide to tie the knot to stave off questions from nosy families or find protection from the law in countries like India where homosexuality is a criminal offence. In India, the Delhi high court decriminalised homosexuality (Section 377) in 2009, but the Supreme Court overturned the ruling four years later.

In 2015, a lesbian couple from China launched a smartphone app iHomo to facilitate marriages of convenience or ‘cooperative marriages’ between gay men and lesbians. But in more conservative India, the LGBT community looks for MoCs on private Facebook groups, chat rooms and Craigslist.

There is still a huge stigma attached to being gay in India. Many Indian parents prefer not to admit that their child is gay, and hope he or she ‘will grow out of it’ once married.

In a marriage of convenience, terms are agreed beforehand, so both sides know what they are getting into – but problems often emerge later.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/why-gay-men-are-seeking-a-marriage-of-convenience/articleshow/60811116.cms

Zanzibar arrests gays

Twenty people have been arrested in Zanzibar for alleged homosexuality.

“They are implicated in homosexuality. We arrested them and are busy interrogating them. The police cannot turn a blind eye to this practice,” said regional police commander Hassan Ali Nasri on state television. The twelve women and eight men were arrested in a hotel where they were undergoing training from an NGO that works on HIV/AIDS education programmes. In February, Tanzania announced it was stopping many privately run health centres from providing AIDS-related services, which Health Minister Ummy Mwalimu said promoted homosexuality.

http://www.africanews.com/2017/09/16/tanzania-20-arrested-in-zanzibar-for-homosexuality/

We’re still not safe

A survey of 5,000 LGBT people has revealed that more than half of gay men in Britain do not feel comfortable holding hands with a partner in the street.
One in five lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender respondents to Stonewall’s poll said they had experienced a hate crime in the past year, ranging from abuse to assault. 81% of victims did not go to the police.

While hate crime was more effectively recorded than in the past, the charity said there had undoubtedly been “a genuine increase” in incidents since its last major survey in 2013.

26% of those affected by hate crime endured unsolicited sexual advances, while 87% reported harassment, intimidation or insults and 11% said they had been physically assaulted.

35% of LGBT people living in the north east of England were most like to have suffered a hate crime, 18% in the north west of England, Yorkshire and Humber.

One in 10 respondents said they had suffered problems trying to either rent or buy a property. That is illegal.

One in six said their sexuality had been an issue in cafes or restaurants, while 10% of those who have attended a live sporting event claim to have been discriminated against.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41179976