Gay pub goes integrated

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Craig and Leon | Kent Online | 17068

The Queen Anne in Maidstone, Kent, has been a gay pub for many years but the new proprietors are a gay couple who have renovated the pub into a pub for the whole wider community, hopefully to enable the pub to survive.

Craig Burns remembers the Sittingbourne Road venue as the beating heart of Maidstone’s lesbian, gay community when he and his husband Leon used to drink there a few years ago. He said: “This is quite a nice challenge for us. A number of people have come and gone over the past few years and the pub and community need some stability. We used to drink here quite a lot when Ricky and Darren were in charge. It was thriving then and we want to make it the heart of the gay community in Maidstone again but are opening the doors for everyone.”

http://www.kentonline.co.uk/maidstone/news/gay-pub-to-welcome-everyone-123880/

Tate bares all

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The Critics | Henry Scott Tuke | Warwick District Council

London’s Tate Britain is preparing its first show dedicated to “queer art” -“Queer British Art 1861-1967”. It is almost 50 years since the decriminalisation of male homosexual acts in England and Wales.

“We have works which demonstrate lots of different attitudes, from anxiety to celebration,” Curator Clare Barlow told the Observer, adding that other items came to acquire notoriety by accident. Walter Crane’s languorous 1877 painting, The Renaissance of Venus, is a good example. “Crane’s wife did not want him viewing or drawing nude women, so instead he used a well-known young male model, Alessandro di Marco, to stand in for the goddess of love.”

The exhibition includes a full-length portrait of Oscar Wilde by Robert Goodloe Harper Pennington, given to the writer as a wedding present by the artist and now being shown publicly in Britain for the first time. Next to it is Oscar’s prison cell door.

Queer British Art 1861-1967 is at Tate Britain, London SW1P, from 5 April to 1 October 2017.

Gay flags at half mast

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Gilbert Baker | Pride Winnipeg | 17063

Gilbert Baker, a San Francisco-based activist and artist best known for creating the rainbow flag representing gay rights, has died at the age of 65. He was living in New York.

Baker, who was born in Kansas in 1951, was stationed in San Francisco in the early 1970s while serving in the US Army, at the start of the gay rights movement.

According to the website biography Baker began making banners for gay rights and anti-war protests, often at the request of Harvey Milk, who would become the first openly gay man elected to public office in California when he won the 1977 race for a seat on the San Francisco board of supervisors.

Milk rode under the first rainbow flags made by Baker at the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade in June 1978.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/31/gilbert-baker-rainbow-flag-inventor-gay-rights-dies

Is Gay TV turning people off?

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A scene from “When we rise” | ABC | 17060

The recent ratings flop of an American TV miniseries about gay rights confirms that Americans are not tuning in to pro-LGBTQ programming, reports Lifesite News.

ABC’s miniseries “When We Rise” was about the “gay rights” revolution. As Heatstreet reported, “When We Rise received saturation ad coverage during the Oscars ahead of its premiere this week. But the hype didn’t work and the show tanked from the first episode.”

When We Rise was the lowest-rated program on the Big 4 US Networks [CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX] and second lowest-rated overall last night, matching the CW’s Supergirl (0.7, even with last week). The CW’s Jane The Virgin (0.3) was off by a tenth.

The Advocate described When We Rise as “a sprawling tale of queer liberation that covers the Stonewall riots to marriage equality to the transgender rights battle.” The ABC series was directed by “out” homosexual Dustin Lance Black, whose previous work includes the acclaimed film “Milk” about Harvey Milk.

In recent years, gay themed television shows have not been successful on American TV. My friends on Facebook who have seen the series were very disappointed and upset by it. Could it be that gay themed TV shows are no longer relevant in some western countries, because we have moved on, and integrated?

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/lgbtq-ratings-flop-americans-keep-rejecting-gay-programming

It must be Spring

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Dublin People | 17057

The sun has been shining on Your Activist for the third consecutive day; the temperature could almost be described as “warm”; on the radio, we heard a man have a request played for his tortoise, Dougal, who has just emerged from hibernation; and the daffodils are out. Now, however we have proof of what we were beginning to suspect: it’s Spring, and Stephen Lehane, from Glenageary, has won the 12th annual Mr Gay Ireland competition.

Before you know it, it will be Pride.

http://www.dublinpeople.com/news/southside/articles/2017/03/13/4136466-stephen-takes-mr-gay-ireland-title-for-2017/

We’ll have none of that sort of stuff here thanks

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A still from the film Ka Bodyscapes | Copyright control | 17052

India’s Central Board of Film Certification has refused to certify the Malayalam film Ka Bodyscapes, saying it glorified “the subject of gay and homosexual relationship” and portrayed the Hindu religion in a derogatory manner by showing Hanuman “in poor light as gay”. It also objected to the portrayal of a Muslim woman masturbating.

The move came days after the CBFC refused to clear the film Lipstick Under My Burkha as the “story is lady-oriented”.

Filmmaker Jayan Cherian, who is based in New York, said the film, that has been selected at several festivals, was denied permission to be screened after intervention from the Information and Broadcasting Ministry. “For instance, screening at the Kerala Film Festival was cancelled at the last moment under pressure from the ministry,” Cherian added.

The film revolves around a gay artist battling censorship against his work. “The artwork in his studio depicts the history of gay art, including nude works by noted artists from across the world. But what the CBFC sees and also objects to is the nudity in those paintings.”

CBFC refuses to clear Ka Bodyscapes, says film glorifies gay relationship

Bona to varda your dolly old hcruhc!

A Church of England theological college has apologised after trainee priests held a church service in Polari to commemorate LGBT History Month.

The service, held at the chapel of Westcott House in Cambridge on 2nd February backfired after causing some members of the congregation to “considerable upset and disquiet”.

The trainees used Polari to underline the “subversive” theme of the evening.

“Glory be to the father, and to the son, and the Holy Spirit” became “Fabeness be to the Auntie, and to the Homie Chavvie, and to the Fantabulosa Fairy”.

Yes, it might just catch on.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/cofe-college-regret-trainee-church-service-held-polari-gay-slang-lgbt-history-month-1604836

Looking the other way

A new study published in the Archives of Sexual Behaviour, which examined the porn-viewing habits of 821 gay, straight, and bisexual men from around the US, found that 55 percent of gay men watch straight porn, and 21 percent of straight men watch gay porn, according to The Advocate.

Dr. Martin J. Downing, the study’s lead researcher, sees this “identity discrepant viewing” as “some level of evidence” of fluidity in sexual attraction, at least in terms of what people are watching.

There’s more. Bi men reported watching guy-on-guy porn just as much as gay men do, and they consumed heterosexual porn almost as much as heterosexual men. According to Downing, bisexual men aren’t “watered down gays or heterosexuals.”

http://www.advocate.com/current-issue/2017/1/04/one-five-straight-men-watches-gay-sex

Gay plays coming soon?

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Robin De Jesús, left, and Michael Urie in “Homos, or Everyone in America.” | Monique Carboni | 16305ga

The New York Times reviews some new gay plays which have been shown recently in New York and hopefully will make it across the Atlantic. They include “Bright colours and bold patterns”, “Homos, or everyone in America” and “Falsettos”.

It is 50 years since “The Boys in The Band” was first performed.

Marking 50 years of legality

It was in 1967 the UK law was changed to legalise homosexuality between two consenting males. The 1967 act amended the law of England and Wales regarding homosexual activity, with Scotland following suit in 1980, and Northern Ireland in 1982.

The British Museum’s new exhibition will highlight the previously-hidden gay histories within its collection, and creates a treasure map of historic LGBTQ moments and objects held by the museum.

The Museum has a coin featuring the Roman emperor Hadrian on one side, and his male lover Antinous on the reverse. Antinous, who would have been part of a harem of the emperor’s lovers, drowned in the Nile river during a lion hunt, leaving the emperor distraught.

Other events will be taking place across the UK at the British Museum, the Red House, the Walker in Liverpool, the Russell-Cotes museum and gallery, and more.

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/british-arts-gay-history-2017-797522